Assoc/Prof David Salonen

Assoc/Prof David Salonen

Assoc/Prof David Salonen

Associate Professor, Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto; Staff Radiologist, MSK Division, Toronto Joint Department of Medical Imaging University Health Network Sinai Health System and Women’s College Hospital, Canada

Dr. Salonen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Imaging at University of Toronto.  He is an attending physician at the University Health Network, Sinai Health System, and Women’s College Hospital.  He completed his undergraduate degree at Queen’s University in Mechanical Engineering and his medical degree at University of Toronto. He did his training in Diagnostic Radiology at University of Toronto and his fellowship in Osteoradiology at University of California, San Diego.

Dr. Salonen’s interests are in sports medicine, total joint reconstruction, and arthritis and is presently a member of the Arthritis Center of Excellence at the University Health Network and a member of the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC).

SESSIONS

XR & CT OF SACROILIAC JOINTS

Reliability and reproducibility of grading sacroiliitis on x-ray;
Distinguishing erosions from other cystic change;
When is CT useful versus MRI

Plenary #1: Imaging the sacroiliac joints

THE SPINE: “PHYTES” IN OA, DISH AND SPA XR CT

DISH – what is it? How to diagnose it? Confidently differentiating “phytes” on X-ray – syndesmophytes vs. osteophytes vs DISH.

Plenary #2: Imaging the Spine and axial SpA

PROBLEM CASES: SACROILIAC JOINTS AND SPINE

See how the experts do it – difficult and borderline cases to be reviewed and discussed (conference attendees can submit their own cases before the conference)

Plenary #2: Imaging the Spine and axial SpA

MRI OF THE HAND AND WRIST

Screening MRI of wrist and hand – suggested protocols in a reasonable time frame;
Distinguishing erosions from enthesopathic or intraosseous cysts;
Use of contrast in MRI of wrist/hand arthritis;
“Synovitis” on MRI – how much synovial enhancement is normal?

Plenary #3: Imaging of peripheral joints

INFLAMMATORY VERSUS SEPTIC JOINT

Clues to distinguishing the septic joint on imaging

Plenary #4: Miscellaneous